Social Media Math Projects

This assignment was particularly difficult for me. We were to find 10-15 projects or case studies related to our content area and grade level that used social media or social networking as a key feature. I am a high school math teacher, so depending on the year I could be teaching Intro to Algebra, Algebra 1, Algebra 2, Geometry, Precalculus, Trigonometry, Calculus, or Statistics, but even with many subject options I still had a difficult time finding actual projects and a couple of the resources I curated are a bit of a stretch or use similar things (Twitter especially). I’ve run into this problem almost every time I try to find relevant examples of using Web 2.0 technologies, and doing this search just made it even more obvious that there is a drastically smaller amount of social media projects for math than for nearly every other major subject. If I were and English or history teacher I would have been set, because almost every project I found was for one of those subjects, even science had more options, but math was very limited. Through this assignment I have learned that social media can be used, but sometimes it’s a bit of a stretch (unless you’re doing probability and statistics, then Twitter is great!). I’m sure as these applications continue to become more prevalent in classrooms there will be more examples and ideas to choose from, but right now it takes a lot of searching and weeding out to find actual social media projects for a high school math classroom.

Here is the link to my curation on Pinterest, and below is the complete list of resources as there were a couple I was unable to pin.

  1. http://shegeeks.net/incredibly-unique-twitter-projects-ii/

This site lists a few different projects that use twitter, but the one that is relevant to math is the one using TweetStats. TweetStats allows students to collect data on how and when someone uses Twitter and then analyze the data and draw conclusions or look for correlations.

  1. http://hillcrestmsfei.weebly.com/teaching-blog/math-integer-project-student-work

This project uses sites like Go Animate, Jing, and Educreations to help students make videos or cartoons to explain concepts about Integers. The videos can then be shared using YouTube.   Students had the choice on how to display the information to differentiate and allow for creativity, some just did posters, some made raps, but a specific format could be set to require students to use social media.

  1. http://mrseteachesmath.blogspot.com/2014/11/awesome-quadrilateral-project.html

This is an interesting Geometry project where students had to use social media (like facebook, instagram, twitter) or create a dating profile for a specific type of quadrilateral. They had to use the dating profile or social media page to explain the properties of the quadrilateral.

  1. http://www.curriki.org/xwiki/bin/view/Coll_Group_GeometryBetaTesters/TEDTalkHouseoftheFuture?bc=;Coll_Group_GeometryBetaTesters.CurrikiGeometryResources

This project uses the very popular community of TEDtalks videos (as well as many other online resources such as Khan Academy) to provide students with the background information help them complete this project on geometry properties relating to houses of the future.

  1. http://ghs2011.ning.com/group/googleearthinmaths

This project uses blogs and Google Earth. Students create a blog to explain how to use Google Earth to do measurements. They must take screen shots of their work and post and explain on their blog.

  1. http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/virtual-field-trips

This project is specifically related to math but depending it could easily be adapted for the math classroom. The project uses Skype or other video conferencing software to allows students to take a virtual field trip or conference with a professional in the field.

  1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fco8OwqkCYU

This project uses YouTube as a platform to share rap videos about math. This specific project was creating a rap about Geometry, specifically polygons. There are many other examples of math rap projects using YouTube, but this is one that shows what the project is about.

  1. http://tbarrett.edublogs.org/2008/03/07/plan-tweet-teach-tweet-learn-smile/

This project uses Twitter to gather data to help explore and explain probability and statistics. In this case, a teacher asked his twitter network a question about the weather and the class analyzed the responses, but the project could be modified for students to use Twitter.

  1. http://realteachingmeansreallearning.blogspot.com/p/facebook-in-math-class.html

This project uses Facebook as the forum to create and answer math questions. Students were given a topic and had (in this case a specific function) and had to use Facebook to explain it.

  1. http://realteachingmeansreallearning.blogspot.com/2011/05/twitter-for-math-nerds.html

I was unable to add this project to my curation because when I tried to Pin it, I got an error saying the invalid image data url and there is no image. This project uses Twitter to gather data to use for a regression activity.

  1. http://realteachingmeansreallearning.blogspot.com/2011/05/glogging-in-math-class.html

I was unable to add this project to my curation because when I tried to Pin it, I got an error saying the invalid image data url and there is no image. This project has students use Glogster to create a Glob with images, videos, etc about a specific topic (this one is about Trigonometry).

  1. http://realteachingmeansreallearning.blogspot.com/2011/03/twitter-like-in-calculus.html

This project has students using Twitter to (or something like it) to ask students questions and force them to really think about their responses in order to be able to explain how to solve a problem in a concise way since their responses are limited to a specific number of characters.

  1. http://www.slideshare.net/travelinlibrarian/twenty-five-interesting-ways-to-use-tw

This slideshare lists many projects using twitter, but the couple that particularly relate to math involve using Twitter to collect data, either by asking questions to the students’ twitter networks or using something like twtpoll to collect and analyze data.

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